Why Is Breslov So Repetitive?

Q: I’m seeking to find my way and hope you may be able to point me in the right direction.

Brief background: I’m about to turn 68, retired, and became a Baal Teshuvah 14 yrs ago. Being a late starter in Orthodoxy and watching life’s clock seemingly speeding up more and more every day, in an effort to learn some many things I’ve mastered absolutely nothing.

In 2005, I was introduced to Breslov Chassidus, and I’ve gone to it and away from it multiple times, because I just didn’t get the simplistic message. The themes become so repetitive I don’t know what I’m missing. I read Hebrew reasonably well, and am just now starting to learn translation so I can, IY”H, eventually focus on the true meanings. With no one to really talk with, it makes the journey into Rebbe Nachman’s world frustrating without benefit of clarification of the things he said.

A: Thanks so much for writing and you should be very encouraged that you are taking life seriously and seeking the true answers to life’s challenges. Have you read the story of the Lost Princess?

http://www.shuvubonim.org/storylp.html

HaShem is also simple and One and we say in Shema everyday – HaShem Elokeinu HaShem Echad!

Yaakov was called Ish Tam – the wholesome/simple one.

Simplicity is the deepest concept in Judaism, but it should NOT be confused with shallowness or dumbness.

True Breslov is not repetitive, it is understanding a concept in a deeper and more real way each time. The nuisances are VERY important. It’s like l’havdil a fine wine connoisseur, no two wines are the same even though they seem to have the same ingredients and appearance. There are subtle hints of different flavors and various other variations which make all of the difference in the world to someone who is trained in this discipline.

We will soon be reporting the launch of an online learning campus and hope this will be very helpful for the many like yourself who are looking for some guidance. In the meanwhile, you are free to write. We also have many great articles and videos on our website.

Kol Tuv, wishing you much hatzlacha!

Author: Yossi Katz

Yossi Katz currently lives in Lakewood, NJ where he runs the BRI American Office. He studied in Beth Medrash Gevoha, as well as the former Breslov Kollel of Lakewood headed by Rabbi Shlomo Goldman.

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