The Sweet Singer

Rebbe Nachman of Breslov taught…
If a person wants to merit to do teshuvah, he should make a regular practice of reciting Tehillim.
(Likutey Moharan II:73)

What does this mean to me?
Rebbe Nachman taught that the concentrated essence of all of the forty-nine paths of repentance—expressed in the forty-nine letters that make up all of the names of the tribes of the Jewish people—are to be discovered within the book of Psalms. Every tribe had its own path of prayer, it’s own way of serving G-d, and every Jew also has his or her unique gateway through which to return to G-d. Immersing ourselves in Tehillim—discovering our voice in Tehillim—will help us find our way.

A prayer:
Dearest G-d, what great kindness You showed us
When You sent us Your beloved King David,
The Sweet composer of Psalms.

You have revealed that saying Tehillim
Opens all fifty gates of mercy and repentance.
So please help me, my family, and all Your holy nation
To say many Psalms every day
With the greatest devotion.

May I put my heart into the words of Tehillim,
And may my ears listen carefully to what I am saying.
Show me, merciful G-d, how to find myself
In each of the verses and chapters of the holy Psalms,
And so arrive at my own gate of repentance.

Help me, through saying Tehillim properly,
Feel the pain of what I have done wrong
And repent with full sincerity.

Then I know I will also find true happiness
In the songs of the Psalms
And return to You in joy.

(Between me and You, p. 314-316)

We encourage hearing your feedback and may anonymously publish your remarks. Please send email to: yehudis.golshevsky@breslov.org
To view the past emails, click here.

Your Comments
When each of us commits an act as a gift to others or as a participant in a work project, there is a bit of us in that transaction. How much of that giving is meant to derive self satisfaction or status and how much of it is meant to be a gift- one given without motivation to secure personal gain or status.
And here is where the verbalization comes in: when working with or giving to others, say to the self,”and may you enjoy this portion that I give you –just for you and not for myself.”

Oddly enough, when you have given in this manner, you reap untold rewards. Even though they are not sought, the return (of that investment) plows back to the self such joy; and sometimes one finds unsought or material benefits there. Amazingly, one never even anticipated that reward but is there- unselfishly there.

CCF

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We encourage hearing your feedback and may anonymously publish your remarks. Please send email to: yehudis.golshevsky@breslov.org
To view the past emails, click here.

NarrowBridge.Org sends out twice weekly inspirational emails. These emails include small doses of Rebbe Nachman’s wisdom, enabling us to get through the week in a more spiritual way. If you are not signed up and would like to receive these emails, click here.

Author: Yehudis Golshevsky

Yehudis in her own words: When I first began learning Rebbe Nachman’s teachings with my husband and other teachers, I felt as though I had come home to the personal and vital relationship with G-d that I’d always sought. Today, a large part of my inspiration comes from helping other Jewish women discover their own spiritual potential through the meaningful teachings of Breslov Chassidut. Yehudis Golshevsky has been teaching Torah classes to women and working in Torah publishing for nearly twenty years. She’s a graduate of Yavne Teacher’s Seminary in Cleveland and holds a degree in Judaic Studies from SUNY at Buffalo. Currently, Yehudis is a contributor to Breslov.org and “Pathways”, the Breslov Research Institute’s weekly publication. Since 2006, she’s been taking women’s groups to Uman and other sites in Ukraine for prayer and study. Yehudis lives with her family in Jerusalem.

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