Partners with G-d

BRI’s NarrowBridge.Org sends out twice weekly inspiration providing a regular dose of hope, meaning and courage. These emails include small doses of Rebbe Nachman’s wisdom, enabling us to get through the week in a more spiritual way. 

If you would like to receive these emails click here.

Rebbe Nachman of Breslov taught…

Be like G-d and don’t look for
people’s shortcomings and
weak points. You will then be at
peace with everyone.
(The Empty Chair, p. 30*)

 

What does this mean to me?

 

I think that, if you ask most people, they might do a double-take at the first statement of this teaching. Does G-d not look for our shortcomings and weak points? Don’t most of us carry around this conception of G-d with us—judgmental and punishing, before Whom our excuses just don’t measure up?

But this is untrue; G-d is our Creator, the One who orchestrates the events of our lives, who is with us as we struggle, who seeks our ultimate good. Since G-d is the only one who is present with us as we face all of the challenges that have proven too much for us, He is the only one fit to render judgment—true justice tempered by all of the mitigating circumstances of which only He is aware. Rebbe Nachman teaches that this knowledge is the root of His abundant mercy.

When the Jewish people sinned with the golden calf, G-d sent Moshe back to the camp. The Midrash adds, “G-d said to Moshe: I am angry with them, and you are angry with them. If so, who will draw them close again?” Reb Nosson taught that this Midrash highlights that G-d is hardly in need of additional judgmental opinions of His children. Quite the contrary; He seeks partners in discovering their good points so that they can be strengthened and the world can reach its purpose.

A prayer:

 

Teach me to search for the fine qualities
in others,
to recognize their immeasurable worth.
Teach me to cultivate a love
for all Your children,
for no one,
no one
is without
redeeming value.
Let the good in me
connect with the good
in others,
until all the world
is transformed through
the compelling power
of love.
(The Gentle Weapon, p. 47**)

We encourage hearing your feedback and may anonymously publish your remarks. Please send email to: yehudis.golshevsky@breslov.org

Feedback:

This is beautiful, I truly love it. I had a disagreement recently with a highly admirable person and I asked Hashem to show me the way where do I go now…when an opportunity presented itself to make a charitable contribution in that person’s honor. It did feel like a new gate opened in my mind, a new channel to pour out love without crossing the boundaries. Thank you for helping me stay in that state.
DM

I just love this one you sent. What great encouragement for us to pursue our own path and individuality, our own uniqueness. The prayer is also very beautiful, it really touched my heart. Thank you so much for sharing these gems of wisdom with us ladies. Your words bring peace to my heart …… May HaShem bless you greatly.
SG

“All beginnings are difficult”

This was perfect timing. I learning Hebrew in ulpan and often feel discouraged because I find it difficult. I got encouragement by these words of Rav Nachman that beginnings are difficult. Bli neder I will give tzaddakah.

Stay well,
PW

*“The Empty Chair: Finding Hope and Joy – Timeless Wisdom from a Hasidic Master, Rebbe Nachman of Breslov” by Rebbe Nachman of Breslov, Adapted by Moshe Mykoff and The Breslov Research Institute, 1994. Permission granted by Jewish Lights Publishing, Woodstock, VT, www.jewishlights.com.

**“The Gentle Weapon: Prayers for Everyday and Not-So-Everyday Moments – Timeless Wisdom from the Teachings of the Hasidic Master, Rebbe Nachman of Breslov” by Rebbe Nachman of Breslov, Adapted by Moshe Mykoff & S.C. Mizrahi with the Breslov Research Institute, 1999.  Permission granted by Jewish Lights Publishing, Woodstock, VT, www.jewishlights.com.

To view the past emails, click here.

Author: Yehudis Golshevsky

Yehudis in her own words: When I first began learning Rebbe Nachman’s teachings with my husband and other teachers, I felt as though I had come home to the personal and vital relationship with G-d that I’d always sought. Today, a large part of my inspiration comes from helping other Jewish women discover their own spiritual potential through the meaningful teachings of Breslov Chassidut. Yehudis Golshevsky has been teaching Torah classes to women and working in Torah publishing for nearly twenty years. She’s a graduate of Yavne Teacher’s Seminary in Cleveland and holds a degree in Judaic Studies from SUNY at Buffalo. Currently, Yehudis is a contributor to Breslov.org and “Pathways”, the Breslov Research Institute’s weekly publication. Since 2006, she’s been taking women’s groups to Uman and other sites in Ukraine for prayer and study. Yehudis lives with her family in Jerusalem.

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