NarrowBridge.Org: The Greatness of Forgetfulness

BRI’s NarrowBridge.Org sends out twice weekly inspiration providing a regular dose of hope, meaning and courage. These emails include small doses of Rebbe Nachman’s wisdom, enabling us to get through the week in a more spiritual way. 

If you would like to receive these emails click here.

 

Rebbe Nachman of Breslov taught…

 

Most people think of
forgetfulness as a defect.
I consider it a great benefit.
Being able to forget frees you
from the burdens of the past.
(The Empty Chair, p. 108*)

 

What does this mean to me?

 

“If only I could forget the wrong that my neighbor did me ten years ago.”
“If only I could forget all of the old baggage that I’m carrying from my childhood.”
“If only I could stop reacting negatively to the situations that I face every single day. I wish I could just put all of my old patterns behind me and start fresh.”
The truth is that we can, because we were given the great gift of forgetfulness. Every capacity within the human character has its potential for holy expression, and forgetting has its place too. One of the words in Hebrew for a human being is an enosh, and its root is in the Aramaic inshi—to forget. How do I learn to forget the memories and ways of thinking that harm me? First of all, I have to really want to let go of them! After that, I have to develop the habit of asking G-d to remove the memories from me whenever they come up. Little by little, I will find myself liberated.
Rebbe Nachman said, “When a person is caught in a morass of clinging mud, he can’t get out all at once. He has one foot in, one foot out; one foot in, one foot; one foot in, one foot out—and then he’s out!”

 

A prayer:

 

Teach me, dear G-d,
to make a fresh start;
to break yesterday’s patterns;
to stop telling myself
I can’t—
when I can,
I’m not—
when I am,
I’m stuck—
when I’m eminently free.
(The Gentle Weapon**, p. 101)

We encourage hearing your feedback and may anonymously publish great remarks. Please send email to: yehudis.golshevsky@breslov.org

Feedback:

Rebbe Nachman saved my life… I am so grateful for your work in bring more of Rebbe Nachman to me on a regular basis. I know that his teachings and his love and faith in HaShem will save many other’s lives and bring many souls closer to HaShem.
In deep gratitude, LC

SHALOM, FOR SOMEONE THAT IS ON JOURNEY HOME, I JUST WANT TO SAY THANK YOU AND A VERY BIG HIGH FIVE TO YOU ALL, MAY HASHEM RICHLY BLESS YOU ALL. MY STUDY IN TORAH HAS OPEN THE DOOR OF MY HEART TO KEEP WALKING IN HASHEM WAYS, IT HAS BEEN A WILD JOURNEY BUT ALSO SWEET TO MY SOUL, AGAIN A MILLION THANKS, B’H. F

 

Shalom alecheim, I thought you may be interested in a picture I took of the Capilano Suspension Bridge in British Columbia, Canada. It’s the longest (and narrowest!) bridge of it’s kind. Regards, David Szego

 

*“The Empty Chair: Finding Hope and Joy – Timeless Wisdom from a Hasidic Master, Rebbe Nachman of Breslov” by Rebbe Nachman of Breslov, Adapted by Moshe Mykoff and The Breslov Research Institute, 1994. Permission granted by Jewish Lights Publishing, Woodstock, VT, www.jewishlights.com.

**“The Gentle Weapon: Prayers for Everyday and Not-So-Everyday Moments – Timeless Wisdom from the Teachings of the Hasidic Master, Rebbe Nachman of Breslov” by Rebbe Nachman of Breslov, Adapted by Moshe Mykoff & S.C. Mizrahi with the Breslov Research Institute, 1999. Permission granted by Jewish Lights Publishing, Woodstock, VT,www.jewishlights.com.

 

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Author: Yehudis Golshevsky

Yehudis in her own words: When I first began learning Rebbe Nachman’s teachings with my husband and other teachers, I felt as though I had come home to the personal and vital relationship with G-d that I’d always sought. Today, a large part of my inspiration comes from helping other Jewish women discover their own spiritual potential through the meaningful teachings of Breslov Chassidut. Yehudis Golshevsky has been teaching Torah classes to women and working in Torah publishing for nearly twenty years. She’s a graduate of Yavne Teacher’s Seminary in Cleveland and holds a degree in Judaic Studies from SUNY at Buffalo. Currently, Yehudis is a contributor to Breslov.org and “Pathways”, the Breslov Research Institute’s weekly publication. Since 2006, she’s been taking women’s groups to Uman and other sites in Ukraine for prayer and study. Yehudis lives with her family in Jerusalem.

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