Keeping the Flame

A Sacred Time – Tevet 1

Chanukah always transitions into the month of Tevet; the final day of the holiday is the second day of the month. The deeper works explain that the light of Chanukah continues to shine spiritually even after the festival.

Just how long we can warm ourselves at the dying embers of the Chanukah lights? The Kabbalists taught that they continue to burn within us through the entire month of Tevet, and even beyond—for a full thirty days after the final night of Chanukah.

This means that the joy and hope that the miracles of Chanukah fill us with can keep us warm through the deepest trough of the winter. How do we keep that spark alive inside? By remembering the lights. Those small candle flames are the embodiments of our own good points; they’re eternal, they continue to shine no matter how dark and cold it gets.

The miracles of Chanukah left an indelible impression on this time of year, comforting us and encouraging us even when we’ve been on the brink of despair. The winter darkness can never swallow down the good. It may be harsh outside, but inside there is so much light.

Dear G-d, help me to carry the flame of Chanukah forward with me into the next month. May those lights—which really shine with the light of my own, unique soul—keep me warm and strong no matter how cold the world gets outside.

Author: Yehudis Golshevsky

Yehudis in her own words: When I first began learning Rebbe Nachman’s teachings with my husband and other teachers, I felt as though I had come home to the personal and vital relationship with G-d that I’d always sought. Today, a large part of my inspiration comes from helping other Jewish women discover their own spiritual potential through the meaningful teachings of Breslov Chassidut. Yehudis Golshevsky has been teaching Torah classes to women and working in Torah publishing for nearly twenty years. She’s a graduate of Yavne Teacher’s Seminary in Cleveland and holds a degree in Judaic Studies from SUNY at Buffalo. Currently, Yehudis is a contributor to and “Pathways”, the Breslov Research Institute’s weekly publication. Since 2006, she’s been taking women’s groups to Uman and other sites in Ukraine for prayer and study. Yehudis lives with her family in Jerusalem.

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