Ask A Breslover: How Do I Know That HaShem Still Loves Me?

Q: How can I know that if i did the worst sins in the world, I can still return to HaShem?

A: You asked very good questions, questions that many of us have asked more than once in our lives. The answers take a certain degree of emunah that a person doesn’t always have. (Our emunah has ups and downs.) May Hashem give you the desire for emunah and the emunah itself.

A Jew has to know that as bad as he has been (even if he has committed every sin in the Torah a 1000 times!), Hashem’s kindness is greater than his sins.

Remember: Before you were born Hashem already knew everything you were going to do — and He created you anyway! 🙂

It was and is worth it to Him all the mistakes you have made, for any good that you will do. This is true even if there’s a lot more time, money and effort in the mistakes than in the good. GOD LOVES AND WANTS YOU!

Each of these is a serious challenge to face. All people think that their problems all come from Hashem. That’s not true. A lot of our problems are of our own making. When we drop a plate, it falls and breaks. That’s NOT Hashem’s fault. Our sins — and our stupidity, immaturity, impatience, anger etc. — have affects in this world. Sometimes the effect is not enough money, sometime depression, sometimes other things.

Even the challenges and problems that Hashem does make for us, are not meant to “get even” with us, chas v’Shalom. As Rebbe Nachman zal put it, “kol hisrachkus he hiskarvus” — whenever Hashem pushes us away, He is really telling us, “Come closer. I want you.”

Hashem doesn’t expect us to overcome all our sins in one day. But the COMMITMENT to try harder, to be better, even a little bit, is what we have to give Him.

Pesach is a week away. Clean out some of the chametz from the old thinking and feeling that you know has to be gone. And starting counting sefirah, go slowly, one little step at a time. As your emunah and effort get stronger, things should also start to get better as well. Amen.

Hope this helped.

kol tuv.

Ozer Bergman

 

Author: Ozer Bergman

Ozer Bergman is an editor for the Breslov Research Institute, a spiritual coach, and author of Where Earth and Heaven Kiss: A Practical Guide to Rebbe Nachman's Path of Meditation.

Share This Post On

3 Comments

  1. I would like to add that although much of our actions are indeed our “fault” Reb Noson explains that this is not a contradiction to the fact that HaShem knew and on a certain level willed us to sin. Reb Noson also clearly says that there is freedom of choice at the same time, so this is not to excuse a person either. But he says there is a way that everything ends up being for our good, even though we cannot fathom how these concepts can both work together.

    Reb Noson goes on to explain that our main freedom of choice is through our prayers.

    I think the bottom line is not to kill ourselves about what we do wrong, we must try our hardest to do what is right but have a certain Emunah that HaShem is still in charge and things will somehow end up being for the good including our sins.

    PS. The vast majority of the above is discussed in Outpouring of the Soul and Restore My Soul. These two books are essential for anyone who really wants to follow Rebbe Nachman’s way.
    We should go about our lives full of simcha and save these moments of introspection for our personal Hitbodedut only and also expect the majority of our changing to come from our prayers. Of course we must strive to do our best but not take our failures so personally but rather throw them to HaShem through true heartfelt prayer.

    Post a Reply
  2. I am very sad in that I suffer from what is called bi pollar disorder I go from very high to very low mental states. Luckily between Breslov and chabad they keep me balanced but I would like a bracha to stay away from the news please shlomo pinchas ben leah hiyah

    Post a Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *