Apolitical or Why We Avoid Certain Topics

You may have noticed that we what we write about in this blog, and in our mailings, is rarely related to current events, and (almost) never to politics. We don’t, not because people don’t ask us to (they do), and not because we have no opinion about such things (we assuredly do). We don’t because controversy and politics get in the way.

The real purpose of life—to become constantly more God-aware—requires a friendly and peaceful atmosphere. And while friends can certainly agree to disagree, generally we are too judgmental about other people’s “wrongheaded” opinions to objectively receive the truth of what their saying. As a result we lose many opportunities to receive someone else’s “good point,” the unique perception of the Divine that only he (or she) has, that you and I need to perfect our own perception of same.

Underlying many, if not all, of Rebbe Nachman’s teachings, is the concept of unity, of arranging one’s life and it’s various facets, so that the individual—and society, and mankind—becomes more whole and integrated, materially, emotionally and spiritually. This is more likely to happen when we generously share what we have. A genuine talmid chakham (as compared to one who merely knows a lot of Torah facts) actively works to expand the attitude and atmosphere of shalom (see Berakhot 64a).

Will Rogers once said, “There’s no trick to being a humorist when you have the whole government working for you.” It would be no trick for us to mock presidents or prime ministers, a ruling party or its opposition. But it would serve no point and it would run counter to Rebbe Nachman’s work of bringing tikkun haolam closer.

The Beit HaMikdash was destroyed because of sinat chinam, baseless hatred. Rebbe Nachman counseled and implored us to pray the Tikkun Chatzot (Midnight Lament) so that the Beit HaMikdash would be rebuilt that much sooner. If we can’t be part of the solution, at least let’s not be part of the problem.

© Copyright 2009 Breslov Research Institute

Author: Ozer Bergman

Ozer Bergman is an editor for the Breslov Research Institute, a spiritual coach, and author of Where Earth and Heaven Kiss: A Practical Guide to Rebbe Nachman's Path of Meditation.

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1 Comment

  1. It’s hard to find well-informed people on this topic, but you sound like you know what you’re talking about!

    Thanks

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